Statue
History

 

In the 1900s cattle on the coastal plains near Busselton were allowed to roam free in the higher forest country in search of feed once the local paddocks had dried up. They were constantly found to favour the sweet grasses of the granite country and so this location was one of the first in the region to be taken up for agriculture at the turn of the 20th century. It is still today considered by local farmers of the district to be prime production land.

The property was still owned and farmed by the descendents of the original settling family when it was purchased by the current owner in 1998 for the purpose of establishing a vineyard.

Indeed the original dirt floor homestead still stands on the property and this together with other old buildings of the era are treasured by the owner as a reminder of the property’s pioneering history.

In pride of place overlooking the entire property stands a solid jarrah fire tower erected in the 1960s by the then Forestry Department. As this land is amoungst the highest in the region, the tower was once a vital link in the Department’s fire control operations. Today more sophisticated methods have seen the tower go out of service but it still stands as a testament to the property’s prominent postion in the landscape.

 

The Vineyard

 

The vineyard sits high on the granite ridges of the Blackwood River Escarpment.

During the growing season, the vines enjoy long hours of sunshine followed by cool evenings and moderate coastal breezes in the afternoon, idyllic growing conditions. Abundant water, granite loam soils and low frost and disease pressure all contribute to reliable quality and consistent vintages.

The first 12 hectares of vines were planted in 1998, with subsequent plantings taking place in 2000, and 2006. The vineyard now comprises 31 hectares of Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz, Merlot, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc, with Tempranillo and Malbec available in 2011.

 

 

Vines